Refusing the state’s self-exoneration

How do we recognize state violence in all of its manifestations? This matters deeply in how we organize around it, refuse it, and how we imagine possibilities beyond it. It matters in our ability to hear the problem spoken in our words in some moments and then when we refuse it in other moments. The…

The functionality of the empathy gap

I have been talking with a few of my mamasisterfriends who live in NYC and have school-aged children. We’ve talked aplenty about the ways in which children in this city, and these are middle and upper middle class children, have to learn to navigate an imposing public transit system, stay in constant communication with their…

Research as relational or Just because I can think of a good interview question doesn’t mean I get to ask it.

  Each fall, faculty are contacted by prospective doctoral students who are interested in furthering their education, acquiring more credentials, becoming researchers, and sometimes looking for another way of being an educator. When students call or email expressing interest, we faculty respond back, often invite them for a visit to campus, and at least where…

Distinctions of humanness and the ongoing colonial project

I’ve been rereading Sylvia Wynter’s epic piece, Unsettling the coloniality of Being/Power/Truth/Freedom, and it has me unsettled and unsettling the ways in which Marxist/capitalist-based understandings of societal inequity must interface with racialized stratification. One of Wynter’s deeply intricate and historically supported points is that far more impactful than labor and economic structure is the fundamental…

Further thoughts on solidarity

I’ve had some interesting conversations about my recent post on the trouble with being ‘in solidarity.’ This brief speech by Fred Moten at the 2009 American Studies Association meeting provides further thought on the discursive move and limitations of signing off ‘in solidarity.’

Unpacking the so-called “language gap”

I had some interactions on social media about the recent surge in word count differences in low SES and high SES children and how this is problematically connected to universal pre-school. The problem is not that pre-school itself is undesirable; the problem is these policy implications are premised on assimilationist and deficit-based views of low…